Dichotomous Air was commissioned by Etsy for their inspiring Brooklyn headquarters building. 

As with all of my installations, this new work relied heavily on process and simple, earthy materials.

The location functions as a hallway, and it was always my intention to imbue this once straightforward space with the same sense of wonder and dimension that the Etsy brand thrives on; the energy in the building is youthful, optimistic, and creative. I knew that I wanted to work from the ceiling, and to use a material that would utilize the natural light that moves around the building throughout the day. By densely enveloping the room with a lightweight, ephemeral material, one feels both cozy and uplifted at once. Weightless and heavy. The work is kinetic but stagnant---the light flutters around the room but the material stays steady. The mica is paper thin but sturdy and sculptural. Woven together in a collective form, but noticeable in individual rounded, stone-like shapes. Transparent and colorful, it is often mirror-like in its ability to reflect light.

The title, Dichotomous Air, revealed itself to me after the installation was complete. Standing in the room, under a mineral canopy that both refracted and reflected the light, I solely noticed dualities and opposing ideas flowing through the space in perfect harmony. There is something undeniably scientific about the work, perhaps the basic materials—copper and mica. They lend themselves to two of my favorite natural elements: light and air. These elements play together in a quiet, musical way, flowing fluidly through the space and bouncing around the walls like playful nymphs. The sound-like quality is literal if the mica pieces knock together (like chimes, or just-frozen water in a lake, pulling and breaking into pieces that clank together by a shore). The room sings and breathes, like a softened, euphonious kaleidoscope of light and color. 

 
Photos courtesy of Paula Abreu Pita

Photos courtesy of Paula Abreu Pita